Grenadines

The Grenadine Islands are each a unique experience. Some are blessed with incredible world class resorts.

Bequia Island 9 miles south of St Vincent and the largest of the Grenadines. It is an island oriented to the sea, retaining age-old traditions of boat building, whaling and fishing. Admiralty bay, the island’s natural harbour is a favourite haven for yachtsmen from all over the world. The island is encircled by gold sand beaches excellent for sailing, scuba diving and snorkeling. Lodgings vary from luxurious resort cottages to simple West Indian inns. Much of the nightlife centres around the hotels, beachside barbecues and steelband entertainment.

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Canouan Island: Measuring 3½ miles by 1¼ miles, Canouan claims some of the best beaches in the entire Caribbean – long ribbons of powder-white sands, wide shallows and coral. The island has an airstrip for for light aircraft

Mayreau Island: One of the smaller Grenadines and privately owned with few residents, it can be reached by boat from Union Island. Salt Whistle Bay Resort is the major hotel. Dennis’ Hideaway is a guest house and restaurant

Mustique Island: A gem of an island measuring 3 by 1½ miles with a landscape as genteel as its lifestyle – green hills roll into soft white sand beaches and turquoise waters. Privately owned, this Grenadine isle has long attracted the elite of the world, including British royalty. The Cotton House, a sprawling 18th century plantation house, has been converted to the islands only resort. The public rooms of the Main House are beautifully decorated with antiques and afternoon tea is served on the verandas. Many attractive villas, including those owned by celebrities, are available for rental through the Mustique Company. Firefly is a charming exclusive hotel

Palm Island: A private resort with a very casual ambiance – 24 beach front stone cottages, open-air dining and all watersports off wide, white shores

Petit St Vincent: The southernmost of St Vincent’s Grenadines, PSV is a 113-acre resort set on rolling hills. The entire island is ringed by white beaches and the foliage is luxuriant. Guests enjoy the ultimate in luxury and seclusion in private cottages with private patios, seaside vistas and a wide range of sporting and marine activities

The Tobago Cays: Numerous islets south of Canouan, guarded by some of the most spectacular coral reefs in the world. You can sail, snorkel and beachcomb in complete seclusion in this rare tropical paradise that can be reached only by yacht. A national marine park is being developed here

Union Island: A 2,100-acre mountainous island fringed by superb beaches, Union Is. is the stopping-off point for yachtsmen and visitors heading to some of the smaller Grenadines. The island features several beachfront inns, all with a simple, relaxed lifestyle.

St Vincent & The Grenadines is located in the Caribbean Sea, 1600 miles southeast of Miami. Situated between St Lucia to the north and Grenada to the south and 100 miles west of Barbados.

St Vincent and The Grenadines has a population of approx. 112,000 (Jan 1998). African, East Indian, Portuguese, Carib and European heritages are present.

La Soufrie volcano: A tour to La Soufrire volcano takes you along the picturesque windward (east) coast of St Vincent, through banana and coconut plantations to where the foot trail begins, leading you along steep volcanic ridges verdant with bamboo and other tropical trees.

This is a day’s journey for energetic hikers, starting early in the morning. The ascent to the crater is about 3¼ miles and well worth it. The expedition can continue down the west side trail and terminate 10 or 12 miles later at Chateaubelair on the leeward coast

Mesopotamia Valley: The panoramic view offered here is probably unsurpassed in the Caribbean. The richly fertile valley is thickly planted with banana, La Soufrien utmeg, cocoa, coconut, breadfruit and root crops – eddoe, tannia and dasheen. Mountain ridges rise all around, Grand Bonhomme dominating at 3,181 ft. Rivers and streams come together at Mesopotamia to tumble down to the sea over the rocks of the Yambou Gorge

Owia Salt Pond: The Owia Salt Pond is located on the north eastern coast of St Vincent close to the Carib village of Owia, a two hour drive along the scenic eastern coast of St Vincent. Along the way you can see the Rabacca Dry River (ash flow from the 1902 eruption of La Soufrire), Black Point Tunnel (dug by the British in 1815 using slave labour) and some of the best black sand beaches in the world. Owia is home to many of the indigenous people of St Vincent. Be sure to take a dip in the famous Salt Pond

Trinity Falls can be reached by following the trail from Richmond on the leeward side of St Vincent. The 45-minute hike will reward you with a magnificent spectacle – a triple waterfall where clear mountain waters cascade over 100 feet to create a huge whirlpool. A dip in this giant ‘jacuzzi’ is an unforgettable experience

Falls of Baleine: Further up the leeward coast from Trinity Falls are the spectacular Falls of Baleine where the waters plunge down a sheer drop of 60 feet to a pool below. The falls can be reached by overland trek but the best and most popular way is by boat from Kingstown or one of the fishing villages on the island’s west coast

Vermont Nature Trails: The Vermont Nature Trails provide another opportunity for hikers and bird watchers to explore the flora and fauna of the rain forest. The trails start in the Buccament Valley. Here the majesty of the rain forest really comes alive. Massive trees, draped in vines with canopies of vibrant greens contrast with open areas where you might spot red-capped green tanager, cocoa thrush, crested humming birds, black hawks, or the rare St Vincent parrot

Trinity Falls: Trinity Falls can be reached by following the trail from Richmond on the leeward side of St Vincent. The 45-minute hike will reward you with a magnificent spectacle – a triple waterfall where clear mountain waters cascade over 100 feet to create a huge whirlpool. A dip in this giant ‘jacuzzi’ is an unforgettable experience.

Falls of Baleine: Further up the leeward coast from Trinity Falls are the spectacular Falls of Baleine where the waters plunge down a sheer drop of 60 feet to a pool below. The falls can be reached by overland trek but the best and most popular way is by boat from Kingstown or one of the fishing villages on the island’s west coast

Vermont Nature Trails: The Vermont Nature Trails provide another opportunity for hikers and bird watchers to explore the flora and fauna of the rain forest. The trails start in the Buccament Valley. Here the majesty of the rain forest really comes alive. Massive trees, draped in vines with canopies of vibrant greens contrast with open areas where you might spot red-capped green tanager, cocoa thrush, crested humming birds, black hawks, or the rare St Vincent parrot.

The Grenadines: The Grenadines are similarly blessed with magnificent beaches, interesting walks and spectacular views. Bequia, Mustique, Canouan, Mayreau, Palm Island, Petit St Vincent and Union Island can all be reached by scheduled ferries, private hire boats or local air services.

Sailing in the Grenadines is a favorite pastime for yachties, but used to be frequented by pirates. The water is exceptionally clear and loaded with colorful marine life.

The people are very hospitable and serve up delightful cuisine fresh from the ocean.

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